Tag Archives: ci

How to fix 8000000A error when building VDPROJ

The Microsoft Visual Studio Setup Project is an old technology to create installer developed by Microsoft. It is out of support from nearly a decade and not present in Visual Studio anymore but when I visit customer sites I find legacy technologies and I need to deal with it on the short-term.

A couple of days ago I was working on an automated CI build on Azure DevOps and we hit an issue when trying to compile an old VDPROJ (migration to Wix in progress, btw ☺). We encountered an HRESULT 8000000A error.

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Reduce your build time with parallelism in Azure DevOps

Your team works with a project in Azure DevOps. Your build time starts to increase as the project’s complexity grows but you want your CI build to deliver results as quickly as possible. How can you do that? With parallelism, of course!

Let’s do this together.

Prerequisites

Before we start to design a build pipeline with parallelism we must be aware of how Azure DevOps orchestrate parallelism and how many parallel jobs we can start. I recommend to read the official Microsoft Docs page about this.

Designing the build

The following example shows how to design a build with:

  1. A first “initialization” job.
  2. The proper build jobs: build 1 and build 2 that we want to run in parallel after the step 1.
  3. A final step that we want to execute after that build 1 and build 2 are completed.

We start with configuring the build to look like the following picture:

To orchestrate the jobs as we specified before we use the “Dependencies” feature. For the first job we have no dependencies so leave the field blank.

For the Build 1 job we set the value to Init. This way we’re instructing Azure DevOps to start the Build 1 job only after that Init has completed.

We do the same thing with the Build 2 job.

For the final step we set Build 1 and Build 2 as dependencies so this phase will wait for the 2 previous builds to complete before starting.

Here we can see the build pipeline while it’s executing.

TL;DR

With this brief tutorial we learned how to design a build pipeline with dependencies and parallelism that can reduce the delay of our CI processes. A fast and reliable CI process is always a good practice because we must strive to gather feedback as quickly as possible from our processes and tools. This way we can resolve issues in the early stages of our ALM, keeping the costs down and avoiding problems with customers.

ALM DOs and DON’Ts – CI builds status

We all know the practice of continuous integration.

One of the common pitfalls about CI is that the build status is not monitored and not treated as one of the top priorities for the team.

build-ci-status

A healty/green status of our CI process means that our code is in a good shape for what our automated tests can tell. Fixing the build status ASAP is easier than leave it red and fix later because the recent changes of the codebase are vivid in the team members’ memory.